Jasper Johns

Jasper Johns

Jasper Johns was born in Augusta, Georgia, in 1930. He studied at the University of South Carolina and the Parsons School of Design, New York. In 1954, after a stint in Japan during the Korean War, he settled in New York and met artist Robert Rauschenberg, who introduced Johns to John Cage and Merce Cunningham, whose practices would have a strong impact on Johns’s artistic development. Along with Rauschenberg, Johns resisted the dominant ideology of the Abstract Expressionists to create a complex language of signs and symbols comprised of familiar images such as targets, American flags, letters, and numerals. His practice would be highly influential to the generation of artists that followed him, shaping the development of the Pop Art movement. The artist has been given solo exhibitions at several prominent institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., the Centre Pompidou, Paris, and the Kunstmuseum Basel. Johns continues to produce new work and currently splits his time between the island of Saint Martin Sharon, Connecticut.

Selected Press

T The New York Times Style Magazine | Returning, Again, to American Drawing in the 1960s

January 27, 2016

An installation view of “Drawing Then: Innovation and Influence in American Drawings of …

Exhibitions

Publications

Artists

Specializing in Works By