• Detail of Giulio Paolini, Mimesi, 1976-1988, two plaster casts, two wooden bases. Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Giulio Paolini, Amore e Psiche, 1981, photo emulsion on canvas, stretchers, colored fabrics (Left); Mario Merz, Pittore in Africa (Painter in Africa), 1984, iron, wire mesh, neon (Right). Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Gilberto Zorio, Stella, 1978, mixed media on paper (Left); Gilberto Zorio, Stella, 1991, aluminum, javelin, iron, lamp (Right). Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Jannis Kounellis, Untitled, 1989, wood column, shoes, lead insoles. Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Mario Merz, From Continent to Continent, 1993, slate, neon, metal structure (Center); Jannis Kounellis, Untitled, 2001, steel sheet, oil lamps, books, lead, jute, blanket, tin (Left); Jannis Kounellis, Untitled, 1986, iron, lead, oil lamp (Right). Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Giovanni Anselmo, Direzione, 1967- 1978, sandstone and magnetic needle. Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Detail of Mario Merz, From Continent to Continent, 1993, slate, neon, metal structure. Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Detail of Jannis Kounellis, Untitled, 2001, steel sheet, oil lamps, books, lead, jute, blanket, tin. Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Giulio Paolini, Saffo, 1981, photography and plexiglass (Front Left); Alighiero Boetti, Clino, 1966, enamel on wood (Back Left); Alighiero Boetti, Mazzo di tubi, 1966, PVC pipes (Right). Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Mario Merz, Che fare?, 1968-1973, neon, wax, aluminum pot, copper handles. Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Michelangelo Pistoletto, Adamo ed Eva, 1962-1987, silkscreen print on polished stainless steel. In the reflection, Luciano Fabro, Efeso II, 1986 (Foreground); Alighiero Boetti, Oggi nono giorno dodicesimo mese dell'anno 1000 nove 100 ottantotto, 1988 (Background). Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Alighiero Boetti, Ghise (Boetti), 1968, cast iron in two parts. Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Giulio Paolini, Mimesi, 1976-1988, two plaster casts, two wooden bases (Center); Mario Merz, Untitled, 1982, taxidermic reindeer head, neon Fibonacci numbers (Left); Giulio Paolini, De Pictura, 1977-1978, pencil, collage, and nails on prepared canvas (Right). Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

  • Luciano Fabro, It-alia, 1971, mirror, lead on wood. Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art, New York. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2017.

Story Oct 24, 2017 Cold Spring, NY

Arte Povera at Magazzino: 'Margherita Stein: Rebel With a Cause'

Magazzino Italian Art, the new private warehouse space in Cold Spring, NY devoted to Postwar and Contemporary Italian art, opened on June 28, 2017 with a blockbuster Arte Povera exhibition: Margherita Stein: Rebel With a Cause. The show is dedicated to Margherita Stein, founder of the historic Galleria Christian Stein and one of the pioneers of the Arte Povera movement.

The exhibition features a curated selection over four decades of the artists whose careers the Italian gallerist fostered, including Giovanni Anselmo, Alighiero Boetti, Pier Paolo Calzolari, Luciano Fabro, Jannis Kounellis, Mario Merz, Marisa Merz, Giulio Paolini, Pino Pascali, Giuseppe Penone, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Gilberto Zorio as well as Marco Bagnoli, Domenico Bianchi and Remo Salvadori.

Margherita was fascinated by the work of the artists of the Arte Povera movement whose work came at a defining moment as Italy was transitioning into an era of burgeoning industrialization, student rebellion and a decline of the “economic miracle” of the 1950’s. These young Italian artists opposed the commercialization of the art object and aimed to eradicate the boundaries between media as well as between nature and art; their mantra was “Art is Life.” In fact, Arte Povera may be considered the last avant-garde movement of the 20th century.

 

Margherita Stein: Rebel With a Cause is now on view at Magazzino in Cold Spring, NY

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